My Top Five Tips For Machine Knitting

 

  1. If you start producing loops at the edge of your knitting, check you haven’t got your weaving brushes on – and also check your yarn is feeding correctly through the tension mast.
  2. If you drop stitches at the side of your knitting, take the weights off the knitting to prevent it from getting worse. Grab your tools and get those stitches back on the needles anyway you can. To prevent dropping more stitches move your edge weights up more often and hang them a tooth or two over the edge of the material – Also check your yarn is going through the tension mast correctly.
  3. Changing your main colour yarn is a dangerous moment. This is when you are most likely to deposit your nearly finished garment, weights and all on to your feet, so always check the yarn is in the sinker plate holder correctly twice, and then maybe just once more to be sure.
  4. When doing a repetitive task always get a system in place so you are less likely to miss a step. I normally sort the yarn, then the carriage, then the needles.
  5. If you’ve been at it for a while, you’re getting tired and you start to make mistakes, that’s the point at which to go to bed. Never knit tired.

 

I have compiled this list from my own mistakes and from having done it wrong myself soooo many times.

My Top Five Tips For Machine Knitting

Use the Best Materials You Can Afford

I have recently splurged out on some lambs wool from JC Rennie, a British Wool producer. It was a bit more than I would usually spend, but my word was it worth it. I produced my first swatch and I haven’t looked back since. I love this wool, in a very deep and real way.

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I have set up my old Jones KH585 which has an eight button patterning centre rather than the punch card on the Knitmaster 360. Even through it is older and more basic, it works as smooth as a lounge lizard on an ice rink. It makes me smile.

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Combining the JC Rennie Wool and the classic machine makes the experience of knitting a real joy. The wool stands up well to a gentle felt. Because of this, I don’t have to cast on and cast off, I can cut it after it’s been felted and small mistakes are just felted out. The time this saves has made me think I might be able to create a lot of items in the little time that the family work schedule allows and if they are popular than I might be on my way to making my hobby my work.

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It has made me think of a piece of advice I’m sure I read somewhere, ‘use the best material you can afford’. This is very true but I would add, practice of the cheap stuff first, with knitting machines, there’s a lot of mistakes to work through first.

Use the Best Materials You Can Afford